The Governor’s Role from a non-governor perspective; Guest Post by Dr Christine Challen

Dr Christine Challen is a Lecturer who describes herself as being passionate about supporting students & preparing them for HE. She believes that continual reflection in practice is key to successful teaching. She is a new blogger who has found her writing muse. Below are her reflections on the role of a governor from the perspective of someone who is not a governor herself.

I thought it would be a great way to start the New Year, with a different spin on Governance. Having never been a governor myself what do I perceive to be the role of a governor within a governing body? More importantly how does and should this impact on the school or college both for staff and pupils/students and ultimately the vision and/or future of the institution?

Before we begin let’s explore what the role of the governor within a governing body is:

“The role of the governing body is to provide strategic management, and to act as a “critical friend”, supporting the work of the headteacher and other staff. …Governors must appoint the headteacher, and may be involved in the appointment of other staff.”

I have specifically chosen this definition as I like the term “critical friend,” However, while it is easy to be taken in by the word friend, for some this will conjure up an element of pleasing and not wanting to “stir the broth.” This is well balanced by the word critical in front because for me that is exactly what a governor should do.

Now I do not for one minute want you all to think that this means it is all about finding fault and being negative but it is key to be questioning, and within this sometimes thinking outside the box for a positive impact not only on staff and students but the future vision of the school.

The term “strategic management.” is an unfortunate description as it implies “continuous planning, monitoring, analysis and assessment” which by default suggests accountability.

In my Bera Blog (2017) I  have described how the presence of business and accountability in education is damaging not only for staff and student wellbeing but also what the real and true meaning of education is about.

The press, media and twitter are full to bursting with real genuine concerns and views from senior experienced educators about high numbers of staff and students with mental health issues as well as challenging behaviour and how we tackle this and provide a truly inclusive education for all to contribute positively and successfully to society and employers. Additionally, there is now an even greater need to embrace the view that we need enriching curriculums that will provide much more individualised approaches to education rather than the constant assessment and exam culture.

The big question is how do I see the role of a governor from an inexperienced eye?

My pet hate is folks that treat this role as a great addition to a CV, instead of a commitment to institution, pupils and staff and a serious role paid or not.

Governors need to fully embrace the attribute of “critical friend” even if it means challenging questions and asking for changes that may not necessarily tick boxes but have lasting changes both personally and academically for schools, pupils and staff alike.

Although Governors need to work with leadership teams, they also need to stand firm in their views even if they are counter to the popular opinion within school boards if we are truly to change education.

Wellbeing, inclusion and individualised education need to be a top priority if we are to ensure that all are able to contribute positively and effectively to a better academic and pastoral environment for all.

They may well be reminded that “rules are for the obedience of fools and the guidance of wise men” and this for me sums up how governors can affect change.

As we pack away our decorations for another year  here is my message to all governors out there – remember your role is pivotal to making changes. Be creative, be questioning, think outside the box, challenge the school and heads and keep at the forefront of your mind the pupils and staff both new and experienced.

Your voice is important and can make changes for the better.

So, as we all ring in the New Year all governors alike let the bells ring even louder for the changes you can make in our schools and education to ensure we do our future generation proud. Look after our teachers not just professionally but their wellbeing as well.

Finally, and aptly as governors remember the words of Nelson Mandela

“Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world” as governors use your voice to enable this for a better future and social justice in society.

 

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