Board diversity matters. Is it time to think about a Young people Board?

I came across Peter Crow’s
website the other day. Peter is non-executive Director and a Board advisor. Though mainly concerned with corporate governance, this website may be of interest to school governors too. The following is a guest blog on Peter’s website and is being posted here with his permission. The original can be read here.

Guest blog: Guy Le Péchon (Gouvernance & Structures, France)

Board rejuvenation is often considered and discussed, but statistics on boards member ages show little progress. The general public thinks a board of directors is a set of relatively old people. Common sense and corporate governance approaches lead one to think that the introduction of new ideas from younger generations would surely be a company asset.

Age diversity within a board is unquestionably desirable, but will one or two younger directors be enough? Probably not. In fact, except in exceptional cases (mainly in new technology fields), board members will probably be least 35 years old—hardly ‘young’ any more—by the time they have acquired the experience needed to be a skilled board director. Also, younger leaders often have full-time jobs, so will there be sufficient candidates available anyway? Recruitment of younger directors may be difficult and generally will not be enough to ensure that potential contribution from truly young people will be brought to the boards. How then to proceed?

One approach to solving this problem might to be create a Young People Board, under the leadership of the official board—a ‘shadow cabinet’ of sorts. With slightly different goals, some municipalities use this approach. A Young People Board could be composed of 18 to 25 year old volunteers—a similar number of members as the official board. Recruitment could be for three-year terms (with renewal of one third every year). The aim would be to achieve multi-faceted diversity.

Periodically (say three times per year), the company board would invite the Young People Board to consider a topic discussed by the official board. The Young People Board would meet to debate the topic and develop proposals. Many ideas would emerge as young people naturally consider new technologies; social networks; data protection; ecology; ethics; and, international perspectives. Each year, a half-day meeting would be scheduled with the official board, to receive presentations and debate the topics studies by the Young People Board.

The Young People Board formula would be light, without any significant expenses or time commitment from the official board members. However, the process would enable official board members to be positively confronted with new ideas coming from truly young people. They may even retain some ideas for implementation!

Members of the Young People Board and, indirectly, their friends and relatives, would derive benefits including learning about the company activities, its executives and, importantly, the ‘corporate governance’ world. Through the process, the company may identify young talents for later hiring. The company could use this approach to improve its image, especially among young people.

Many speeches and writings advocate innovation. As one dwells on this, the realisation that innovation applies not only within technology areas, but also in organizational processes and the social domain. The Young People Board is a concrete example of this type of innovation. Is this something your board can support? If so, please contact Guy Lé Pechon at Gouvernance & Structures.

Guest blog: Guy Le Péchon (Gouvernance & Structures, France)

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3 thoughts on “Board diversity matters. Is it time to think about a Young people Board?

  1. Peter Crow

    Thank you Naureen. Your readers may be interested to learn that I served for nine years on the board of a high performance secondary boys school, including six years as chair. Am regularly asked to assist with governance questions in the education sector.

    Reply
  2. seankfletcher

    Reblogged this on strategic teams and commented:
    Guy Le Pechon writes: Board rejuvenation is often considered and discussed, but statistics on boards member ages show little progress. Age diversity within a board is unquestionably desirable, but will one or two younger directors be enough? Perhaps the answer is a Young Board of Directors instead – a shadow cabinet of sorts…

    Reply

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